the method of recovering drowned persons

To the PRINTER

++Sir,
++++When I see so many accidents of drowning in the newspapers (every summer in particular from bathing) I cannot but wonder and grieve, that the method of recovering drowned persons, lately published in the first number of the work called The Weekly Amusement, is not tried upon any of these unfortunate persons. The person who communicates this method of recovering them, (which is nothing more than rubbing the naked body of the drowned person with SALT, most particularly about the temples, breasts, and joints) assures that it was tried on a sailor who fell overboard at Oporto, and continued under water full half an hour. The operation was continued for some time; and in less that four hours, to the great surprise of everybody, he came so entirely to himself that he was able to walk.
++The experiment has since been tried on animals kept under water for two hours, and then covered all over with salt, except their nostrils, In a short time they begin to breathe, and discharge the water from mouth, ears, &c., and in the space of about 3 or 4 hours they all got up and run away.
++The above being a real truth, and the experiment so very easy, it is a most inexcusable obstinacy and inconsiderateness not to try it upon every drowned person, though they may have been under water for even some hours. — For the ground of the success of this experiment, &c. I refer to The Weekly Amusement — which, for the sundry useful and entertaining particulars it contains weekly, and its cheapness, being no more than Three-pence, well deserves to be taken in by every family.